Haiti was flooded by torrential rains as Hurricane Lili passed over the southern part of the country from 27th to the 29th of September 2002. Miraculously the storm subsided from hurricane force to the level of a tropical depression, but nevertheless 16 inches (410mm) of rain fell, causing the Ravine du Sud river, once again, to leave its banks and flood through the market town of Camp-Perrin, Haiti.
(After leaving Haiti, Hurricane Lili regained trength, passing over Jamaica, Cuba and eventually hitting the United States as a Force 2 hurricane).

   
Download report on floods caused by Hurricane Lili in Haiti Download the French version of the photo report (pdf file) Download English version of the photo report (pdf file)   View photos of the hurricane floods in southern Haiti ...
Camp-Perrin in danger again as another hurricane passes over! Click here to view a photographic report - as the Ravine du Sud river flows through the center of town, causing severe damage, loss of goods and economic hardship. The population tries to save as much as they can: in English (PDF file) or in French (PDF file).

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TORRENTIAL FLOODING IN CAMP PERRIN AS HURRICANE LILI PASSED OVER HAITI...

Torrential floods submerge buses in the center of Camp-Perrin, in the south of Haiti. As the streets became raging waterways, house, stores and warehouses were inundated, and a considerable amount of merchandize and household goods were lost. Fortunately there was no loss of life, just increased economic hardship. Hurricane Lili miraculously dropped in strength as it passed over Haiti.
Buses traveling from Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, are overwhelmed by the rising waters. 16 inches of rain fall as Lili passes over Haiti. The passengers escape with their belongings, but the buses remain trapped in the torrential waters that flood through the center of town.
     
 
The river flows with great force around the houses. Flood waters submerge the lower stories of buildings in the business district and large stocks of provisions and merchandise are lost.
The population gradually recovers. Two thirds of people in Haiti earn a living from agriculture. Natural disasters and hurricanes are part of the life. But they need support to replant crops lost during the floods caused by Hurricane Lili.

As the population recovers, many fear for the future of the town. Fortunatley, Hurricane Lili was not the most severe storm of the year. But the town has becomes more and more vulnerable every year to the increasing furor of the flash-floods caused by deforestation in the mountains above, especially during the hurricane season. But everyone is grateful that at least this time we were spared the force of a full-blown hurricane.

Information about Hurricanes in Haiti since 1950
Apart from Hurricane Lili, the following is some information about the major hurricanes that have affected Haiti since 1950. It should be noted that damage is caused by two factors, wind and flooding. Some hurricanes cause little wind damage, but extensive destruction from flooding, and vice-versa. The south of Haiti, where ORE is based, is particularly vulnerable to hurricanes:
Hurricane Name
Date
Wind
Deaths
Damage
Georges
Sep 22, 1998
120 mph
150 - 500
Severe flooding and loss of life in Haiti
Emily
Sep 22, 1987
120 mph
n.a.
Damage in Haiti
Allen
Aug 5, 1980
140-160 mph
220
$400 million of damage, principally in the south of Haiti
Inez
Sep 29, 1966
140 mph
750
$20 million of damage in Haiti
Cleo
Aug 24, 1964
150 mph
192
$17 million of damage, principally in the south of Haiti
Flora
Oct 3, 1963
145-180 mph
5,000
Extensive damage in the south of Haiti
Ella
Sep 1, 1958
110 mph
30
Damage in the south of Haiti
Hazel
Oct 11, 1954
120-125 mph
400-1,000
Extensive damage in the south of Haiti

Source: National Climatic Data Center

VIEW FULL SIZE PHOTOS OF THE RECENT FLOODING CAUSED BY HURRICANE LILI!
Click here to download a photographic report of the floods in Ravine du Sud, showing the extensive damage to the town and the danger from future hurricane flooding. Download the report in English (PDF file), or French (PDF file).



Since 1985, the Organization for the Rehabilitation of the Environment
has developed and operated fruit tree grafting and crop improvement programs in rural Haiti.
During those years several international agencies have generously provided the funding that made it possible to maintain continuity of our development projects. These include USAID, the European Union, the Canadian Embassy, Inter-American Development Bank and other contributors.

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Florida Non-Profit Corporation with (501(c)(3) tax-exempt status): ORE Inc. P.O. Box 16-1510, Altamonte Springs, FL 32716, USA
Haitian Non-Government Organization: ORE, B.P. 2314, Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

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Updated 10/05/02.